Articles

Grevs Ivan

Grevs Ivan (1860–1941) – historian, one of the founders of the Russian school of medievalism. After the Larin Gymnasium, in 1879, he entered the Historical and Philological Faculty of the St. Petersburg University; there he wrote his first research work ‘Roman Byzantine State in the Sixth Century on the Base of Canonic Books of Christian Emperors’. He took part in groups of Narodniki, from 1886 till 1903, he was under a hidden police surveillance. In 1890-s, he made lectures at the St. Petersburg University, and at the Bestuzhev Female Courses (1892-1899 and 1902-1918). In 1900, he defended his Master thesis ‘Essays from the History of the Roman Landownership, Mainly in the Epoch of Empire’. In 1890-1892 and 1894-1896, he had training periods abroad. Since 1905, he was a member of the CD Party (Constitutional Democrats).
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Grigoriev Vasily

Grigoriev Vasily (1816–1881) – historian and orientalist, specialist in the culture of peoples of Near and Middle Asia, disciple of Ch. D. Frahn and О. I. Senkovsky. After the graduation from the Historical and Philological Faculty of the St. Petersburg University (1834), G. taught there Persian language (1835-1838). In 1838-1844, he worked at the Chair of Oriental Languages at the Richelieu Lyceum in Odessa. In 1851, he moved to the Orenburg Region, where he took a position of the head of the border expedition, which provided him a possibility to write several articles on the Turkestan Region. As early as in 1837, he offered to the University Council an idea to found a Chair of Oriental History; it was opened at the Faculty of Oriental Languages in 1863, and G. was invited as Full Professor.
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Grigulevich Joseph

Grigulevich Joseph (1913–1988) – Soviet intelligence agent under non-official cover, later historian of religion, Correspondent Member of the Ac. of Sc. of the U.S.S.R. (1979). Since the years of his gymnasium learning, he has taken part in the Communist movement in Lithuania and Poland. In 1931-1933, he was arrested and kept in the Polish-Lithuanian jail of Łukiszki for his revolutionary activity. In August 1933, he was sent out of Poland. In 1933-1934, he studied at the High School of Social Studies in Sorbonne (Paris). In 1934, Cominter sent him to the Argentine. In September 1936, he came to Spain through the Comintern lines. In 1937-1953, he worked under cover in several countries of Latin America and Europe.
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Grinblatt Moses

Grinblatt Moses (1905–1983) – Belorussian historian, ethnographer, folklorist, specialist in folk religion. He graduated from the Leningrad State University (1930); worked at the Belorussian Department of the Narkomat of Education (1920); since 1930, he worked at the system of the Ac. of Sc. of the Belorussian Soviet Socialist Republic: at the Institute of History (1931‒1941; 1945‒1956), and at the Institute of Linguistic, Ethnography, and Folklore (1957‒1976). At the same time, he made lectures at the Minsk Teachers-Training Institute (1937‒1941), and at the Belorussian State University (since 1939). He was one of the authors of ‘The History of the Belorussian Soviet Socialist Republic’ in 2 and in 5 volumes.
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Hyacinth  (Bichurin Nikita Yakovlevich)

Hyacinth (Bichurin Nikita Yakovlevich) (1777–1853) – аrchimandrite, the founder of Sinology in Russia. He was born in the village of Akuliovo in the family of a priest; in 1787–1799, he studied at the Kazan’ Seminary, and at the Kazan’ Spiritual Academy; in 1800, he became monk, and in 1802 – Archimandrite of the Ascention Monastery in Irkutsk, Rector of the Irkutsk Spiritual Academy, member of the Consistory. In 1806, he lost his positions and was sent to exile to Tobolsk, where he shaped his interest to studying peoples of China and Siberia. In 1807-1821, he lived in Bejing, where re served the Head of the Russian Ecclesiastic Mission.
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Innocence (Veniaminov-Popov)

Innocence (Veniaminov-Popov) (1797-1879) – Metropolitan of Moscow. Missionary, translator of the Bible into languages of peoples of the North, ethnographer, geographer, linguist, researcher of traditional culture of peoples of the North. He graduated with honours from the Irkutsk Spiritual Seminary; there he got the surname Veneaminov to his father’s one (1814). He taught at the parish school. In 1823, he was appointed a missionary, and in 1824 with his family arrived at the island of Unalashka (Aleutian Islands); later, he was transferred to Sitha. He studied languages of the indigenous peoples of Alaska, as well as their traditional culture, and religious beliefs. Together with his assistants, he was engaged in translating liturgical texts into the languages of peoples of the North, compiled ethnographic and geographical descriptions of Alaska and the islands of Unalashkinsky Bay.
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Ionov Vsevolod

Ionov Vsevolod (1851—1922) – ethnographer and folklorist; specialist in Turkish, Yakutian studies, revolutionary ‘Narodnik’. He was born in Astrakhan. After the gymnasium at Tsaritsyno, he entered the St. Petersburg Technological Institute, but in 1875, he was fired out for the political propaganda. In 1876, he was arrested; in 1877, he was sentenced to five years of forced labour for the revolutionary activity; I. spent them in the Novobelgorodsky Central Prison and later at the Nerchinsl Katorga (r. Kara). In 1883, he was transferred to the settlement in the Bayagantay Ukus in Yakutia, where he lived for six years, then he was sent to the Boturuss Ulus, from where in 1899, he went to Yakuts, on the permission of authorities.
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Jagić Ignatius (Vatroslav)

Jagić Ignatius (Vatroslav) (1838‒1923) – philologist, specialist in Slavic studies, linguist, paleographer, and archeographer. He studied at the Philosophical Faculty of the University of Wien, taught at the Zagreb Gymnasium. In 1866, he was elected for Members of the South-Slavic Academy of Sciences and Arts. Academician of the St. Petersburg Ac. of Sc. in the Department of Russian Language and Literature (1869). He made lectures in comparative grammar of Indo-European languages and Sanskrit at the Novorossiisk University (1872-1874), in Slavic philology at the Berlin University (1874-1880), in Church Slavic and Russian languages at the St. Petersburg University (1880-1886) – also he made lectures ate the Higher Female Courses and at the Archeological Institute. Professor of the University of Wien (1886-1908). One of the greatest experts in the field of Slavic linguistics of the second half of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.
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Juze Panteleymon

Juze Panteleymon (1870–1942) – born Bandali ibn Saliba al-Jauzi. He was born in an Orthodox Syro-Arabic family in Jerusalem. The initial education he got in two Greek monasteries (in Lebanon and Palestine). In 1880-2, he studied at the Nazareth Seminary opened by the Imperial Orthodox Palestinian Society; for the excellent results he was sent to Russian, to the Vifanskaya Seminary (1889-1892), then in the Moscow (1892-1895) and Kazan’ (1895-1896) Spiritual Academies. An important role in his following destiny was played by Orientalist and Missionary, teacher of the Kazan’ Spiritual Academy M. A. Mashanov. He recommended J. for the Chair of Arabic Language, History and Criticism of Islam. In 1896, J. started to teach Arabic language at the Kazan’ Spiritual Academy; since 1899 – French language, as well.
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Kagarov Eugeny

Kagarov Eugeny (1882–1942) – historian of Classic culture, philologist, ethnographer, historian of religion. He graduated from the Classical Department of the Novorossiisky University in Odessa in 1906. After it he was invited to stay at the same university and to prepare himself for the Professor position. In 1909-1911, he was in educative trip in Germany, Italy (Rome), and Greece. In 1911-1912, he was Ass. Docent of the Novorossiisky University; Ass. Professor – in 1914-1920, Full Professor – in 1920-1925 at the Kharkov University. In 1913, he defended his Master thesis ‘The Cult of Fetishes, Plants, and Animals in Ancient Greece’ at the Moscow University (it was published in 1914).
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